GBCI

The Housing Crisis: How Architects Can Drive Change

Learn how the industry can reduce the cost of housing development leading to affordable housing solutions.

Description: 

Cities across the United States are struggling with housing shortages. In the midst of this crisis, the HKS San Francisco studio was awarded an internal design fellowship research grant to explore a pressing question: How can architects help optimize the design and construction of multifamily housing? In this course, the panelists will present HKS's key takeaways from a year-long deep dive into this critical issue. Learn how our industry can address the cost of housing development through modularization, off-site construction, and lean manufacturing methods, and examine opportunities to streamline the construction process, reduce labor costs, and shorten construction durations.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Enhance your understanding of the economics behind residential and multifamily development, including development fees, land costs, construction costs, and soft costs like design fees
  • Identify and understand proposed and current local legislation to help incentivize and streamline housing development at all levels of affordability 
  • Look at building design as part of whole-project cost, and identify with the team opportunities for savings—e.g. designing a unitized building façade, designing bathrooms to be pre-fabricated, or designing to accommodate a shortened construction schedule
  • Identify opportunities early on to set up designs for flexibility and to successfully implement off-site construction, modular components, and/or pre-fabrication

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

HSW

Instructor

Arnold

Bradshaw

David

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Expiration

One year after purchase

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
4.207115

Related Courses

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

Make this Course hidden?

No

Repurposing Everyday Buildings: Extraordinary Renovations of Ordinary Structures

Expanding adaptive reuse strategies for buildings that would previously have been overlooked or demolished.

Description: 

In the past, only large institutions could afford to completely renovate existing buildings, but private clients today are asking architects to radically renovate modest structures.  This session will explore their motivations, from project budgets to communicating a progressive brand, and provide a sense of what the changing environment means for you. 

Learn why architects are now expanding the use of adaptive reuse strategies to include buildings that would previously have been overlooked and demolished, review the history of adaptive reuse, and see examples of extraordinary renovations and additions to everyday buildings.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Discuss the differences between preservation and restoration as understood in Europe and master the vocabulary of adaptive reuse.
  • Compare strategies and techniques of adaptive reuse using international examples and learn new ways to reuse existing buildings.
  • Analyze examples of adaptive reuse in the United States, and dissect the elements of their success, including the design process and financial impacts.
  • Experience a thoughtful conversation about respecting history while planning for the future.

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

HSW

Instructor

Fisher

Spolidoro

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Expiration

One year after purchase

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
3.958655

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

Make this Course hidden?

No

Buildings as Habitat: Biophilic Design Toward Biophilic Urbanism

Biophilic design offers a paradigm shift toward the creation of innately restorative human habitat. As cities embrace the integration of nature, this principle is giving rise to biophilic urbanism.

Description: 

Biophilic design offers a paradigm shift toward the creation of innately restorative human habitat. As cities embrace the integration of nature, this principle is giving rise to biophilic urbanism. 

This course explores the evolutionary origins of innate human spatial preferences and their relevance for designers tasked with today’s environmental, health, and social challenges. Energize your practice through discussion of current research and evidence-based design that form the building blocks of biophilic design and urbanism. 

In light of forecast climate conditions at 20-100 year horizons, you will consider the application of biophilic design to support resilience through mitigation of urban stressors such as heat, drought, increased precipitation, and shortage of "refuge spaces" in urban centers. 

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Identify innate human spatial preferences and their evolutionary survival origins by studying an overview of current science supporting these preferences.
  • Discover the biophilic design ingredients necessary for the design of physiologically restorative "well-being places," which measurably sustain us.
  • Study examples of biophilic urbanist interventions as essential design and public health initiatives, and learn how they restore urban ecologies and mitigate heat stress, drought, and stormwater events in urban centers.
  • Examine the quantifiable economic and public health benefits of biophilic design and biophilic urbanism.

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

HSW

Instructor

van Vliet

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
4.20652

Related Courses

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

Make this Course hidden?

No

Understanding Biophilia and Biophilic Environments for LBC and WELL Certification

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We speak anecdotally about nature's therapeutic effects on our lives. What does science tell us about humans' relationships with nature, and how does that relate to the work we do?

Description: 

Some hypothesize that humans evolved to connect with nature, and research suggests this connection remains instrumental to our health, productivity, and well-being. That understanding has brought the concept of biophilia (the "love of life or living systems") to the forefront when it comes to creating healthy built environments.

Both the Living Building Challenge and WELL Building Certifications require the creation of biophilic environments. Through this presentation, you'll better understand the concept of biophilia, the research and data that support it, and the strategies for integrating biophilia into your work.

Position your projects to meet certification requirements—and gain insights into human experience you can share with clients or around the dinner table.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Discover and experience BIOPHILIA as an innate human evolutionary survival imperative. They will recognize that BIOPHILIA is something we comprehend as a biological organism and this understanding will influence their design decisions in the future.
  • List the evidence-based scientific data underlying BIOPHILIA as it relates to human health and well-being, including current research from the fields of evolutionary biology, neuroscience, immunology, behavioral ecology, and environmental psychology.
  • Define BIOPHILA as the tool, which allows sustainability to move into the realm of sustainable human health and well-being, resulting in highly adaptive and highly resilient integrated systems for a restorative human habitat.
  • Identify BIOPHILIA as the core of the Living Building Challenge, as the foundation of the WELL Building Standard and to utilize BIOPHILIC STRATEGIES to create mutually reinforcing, interconnected and integrated architectural solutions

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

HSW

Instructor

Calabrese

van Vliet

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
4.509805

Captivate URL

/2017-SA206/

Related Courses

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

Tiny House in a Big City: Competition/Construction Case Study

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Are tiny homes a solution for housing homeless youth? And can they be built in a city?

Description: 

Landon Bone Baker Architects and AIA Chicago launched an international competition to build a prototype tiny home, attracting 400 entries. The winning design resulted in a spacious, furnished, and charming model that is now being reconstructed as a learning model.

Join us and to hear how they did it, what it cost, code issues, and other lessons learned so you can explore whether tiny homes might be an affordable housing option for your community.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Understand when, where, and why tiny houses might be appropriate—and when they may not work.
  • Develop a path to propose and introduce tiny houses in your community (zoning, code, accessibility, sustainability, community, and sociological issues will be addressed).
  • Understand the real economic costs and benefits of tiny houses, which can be affordable alternatives to subsidized housing in certain applications.
  • Reference other existing tiny home communities and share knowledge of how they work.

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

HSW

Instructor

Baim

Baker

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Expiration

One year after purchase

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
4.204545

Captivate URL

/2017-FR413/

Knowledge Level

Introductory

Make this Course hidden?

No

Problem-Solving Collaboration: National Museum of African American History and Culture

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Learn from design team leaders from the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Description: 

Design team leaders from the National Museum of African American History and Culture will apply project takeaways applicable to the specific interests and needs of the AIA audience. These applicable lessons include:

  • Achieving the client’s vision of creating column-free space with no structural steel above grade by developing solutions including use of structural cores, cantilevered girders, and hung vertical trusses
  • Providing architectural, civil, structural, and environmental solutions for responsible management of the water table and the multiple methods explored to integrate the water table into a design where 60% of the structure - 5 levels - is built below ground within the DC tidal basin.
  • Managing multi-stakeholder input from the Smithsonian, federal and DC agencies, design review stakeholders, and public boards and citizen stakeholders in the District
  • Designing the most sustainable national museum ever built
 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Be prepared to move beyond prescriptive approaches to apply creative structural solutions.
  • Discover how to manage site and grade issues to satisfy multiple stakeholder and community needs.
  • Describe the value of successfully locating mechanical systems to meet strict design criteria.
  • Determine 0how and when to use full-scale mockups to test unique building elements.

Product Reference

1.50 LUs

Credits

HSW

Instructor

Corrado

Howard

Rosenberg

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Expiration

One year after purchase

Duration

1:30

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
4.6875

Captivate URL

/2017-TH208

Related Courses

Knowledge Level

Introductory

Blind Spots: Multisensory Placemaking for the Blind and Visually Impaired

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Explore how you can go beyond mere compliance with ADA codes to address the opportunities—not just the challenges—of the visually impaired.

Description: 

Using the new 40,000 GSF LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired in San Francisco as an example, this session will address issues related to acoustics, lighting, and technology. You'll also explore general strategies for visual and nonvisual design.

While complying with ADA codes is necessary, you have the opportunity to produce designs that are not overtly adaptive or condescending. By attending this session, you'll discover how to give all users of your spaces—particularly the blind and visually impaired—a sense of delight.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Understand visual accessibility and how you can maximize visual acuity with lighting design, contrast, and strategic multisensory finish pallets.
  • Learn how to work with acoustic design to support nonvisual wayfinding and speech intelligibility, and to animate community.
  • Know how and when to use the expertise of consultants and strategic user groups to create successful, creative, and integrated solutions for visual accessibility and universal design.
  • Leverage nonvisual design strategies to increase social and broad lifespan inclusion while enriching the experience for all.

Product Reference

1.75 LUs

Credits

ADA
HSW

Instructor

Cavagnero

Downey

Glasow

Myrbeck

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation
User rating:
4.612405

Captivate URL

/2017-TH202/

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

Make this Course hidden?

No

U.S. Based Codes and Standards in International Design

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Examine the application of International building codes in non USA settings and in multiple building types through the lens of real world examples.

Description: 

If you design projects internationally, you may intend to use U.S.-based codes in addition to local codes. But that often leads to conflicting fire protection and life safety requirements.

Join us for this session to uncover solutions. Speakers will discuss:

  • Examples of three codes from areas around the world—and how the application of "international" codes served as an alternate design approach
  • Performance-based design as an alternative to prescriptive code compliance
  • Other alternate solutions and how these different approaches can impact your project

In addition, you'll learn about the fundamental International Building Code as well as portability principles and local interpretation.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Participants will be able to identify and understand the key considerations for using US based codes on International projects.
  • They will be able to understand the fundamental International Building Code (IBC) process as it applies to portability and local interpretation.
  • Practice Professionals will leave the seminar understanding the use of the IBC as an "International Best Practice" approach to dealing with local code officials.
  • Participants will be able to describe to their colleagues specific real world examples of solutions to competing local and International 

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

HSW

Instructor

Antell

Lincicome

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Expiration

One year after purchase

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
4

Captivate URL

/TH403-2016/

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

Make this Course hidden?

Yes

Unpacking the World’s Greenest Lab: Performance vs. Predictions

Learn how to narrow the gap between building design and actual performance.

Description: 

What does the world’s greenest lab look like? This eco-focused course features a virtual tour of the Venter Institute, which was built in 2013 as a fully carbon-neutral facility. Panelists compare the original design goals to its actual performance.

Key topics include:

  • A full carbon study, including embodied carbon associated with construction materials and operational carbon associated with water and energy use
  • Projected and actual costs, including design, operations, and construction
  • Energy- and water-use predictions and practices

You’ll come away with a greater knowledge of how to manage the cost and measure the performance of sustainable structures.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Explain carbon analysis development, including both operational and embodied carbon.
  • Discuss some of the most effective and practical engineering design approaches to net zero water and energy.
  • Examine how to manage cost during the design process.
  • Demonstrate how to build a Life Cycle Cost Analysis.

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

HSW

Instructor

Hyman

Matthiessen

McDonald

Palmore

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Expiration

One year after purchase

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
4.34091

Captivate URL

/TH414-2016/

Related Courses

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

Video Embed

Why is Accessibility So Hard?

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Cut through the confusion; create an action plan for efficiently achieving accessibility.

Description: 

Accessible design is inherently challenging because it’s not a "settled science." Standards are constantly evolving—sometimes even in conflict with one another. This course will cut through the confusion.

Our discussion/exploration will:

  • Review compliance missteps and achievements in real-world scenarios
  • Identify phases of the design process where various concerns are best addressed
  • Help you create a clear plan for accessibility success
  • Address questions, comments, and concerns from members like you

Hear from accessibility experts and learn from the experiences of your peers in this clarifying course.

 $40 

Learning objectives

  • Explain the best ways to design accessibility into projects at each phase of the project. 
  • Identify valuable no-cost accessibility resources available throughout the country and funded by the federal government. 
  • Apply knowledge of the problem/solution process (identify, analyze, address) exemplified in the course to your practice.  
  • Use the checklist of accessibility issues at each phase of your project work. 

Product Reference

1.00 LU

Credits

ADA
HSW

Instructor

Dipner

Janas

Schmidt

Wicksman

Course details

Contents

Video, quiz, evaluation

Expiration

One year after purchase

Duration

1:00

Passing Score

80% on quiz
User rating:
3.90909

Captivate URL

/TH411-2016/

Related Courses

Additional resources

AttachmentSize
PDF icon Slide Handouts1.95 MB

Knowledge Level

Intermediate

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